Back in 2010, Jaguar unveiled a supercar called the C-X75. It was the most technologically advanced car the company had ever produced. It featured a sexy exterior crafted from carbon fiber. The original concept was to use two micro gas turbines as generators for four electric motors attached to each wheel. When it hit the scene it stunned much of the industry and has since become a dream car for many people who love high-tech cars built for speed. The Ian Callum designed supercar was like nothing Jaguar had ever done before, and not even the XJ220 supercar was as beautiful.

Jaguar C-X75

Eventually, the powertrain setup was altered. Instead of using the two gas turbines, a 1.6-liter turbocharged and supercharged four-cylinder engine was paired with the same electric motors. The engine alone created 500 hp and each of the electric motors can supplement that with as much as 195 hp. The C-X75 was certainly quick, with a 0-60 time of 3.3 seconds and a theoretical top speed of 220 mph. It was one of the fastest, most exotic cars ever created, and Jaguar got the world's attention in a very big way.

The car was meant to show what a 21st century supercar would be, and the C-X75 was created to usher in the future of Jaguar technology and materials. Its hybrid crosshairs were set on the La Ferrari, the McLaren P1, and the Porsche 918. For a short period of time, the C-X75 was supposed to get to production. Jaguar pledged to build a maximum of 250 cars at a price of well over a million dollars, but in December of 2012 those plans came to a halt and smashed the dreams of wealthy car enthusiasts around the globe. 

Jaguar C-X75

The concept car made its rounds and many first drive reviews have been published. The car also made an appearance in the 24th James Bond film called Spectre. While the car was unmistakably the C-X75, it didn’t feature the unique power plant that was in the concept car, instead, there was a 5.0-liter V8 engine stuffed in the vehicle’s engine bay that produced 542 hp.

This rekindled rumors of a production version of the C-X75, but Jaguar’s brand director Adrian Hallmark stated that the C-X75 would be used as an example to further Jaguar’s more typical production vehicles. We don't care what Jag's folks say, we still think this thing should be built. Until Jaguar can make a business case for it, we'll just keep staring at these photos. 

jaguar c-x75

Jaguar C-x75

Jaguar C-X75

Jaguar C-X75