Scientists Predict the Future of Automobiles

New book claims electricity will power most cars by 2050.

Trying to predict the future beyond about 36 hours is incredibly difficult, just ask any bookmaker, weather forecaster, or stock market analyst. Actually, don't ask those people because they'll all lie, secure in the knowledge that no one ever bothers to check if they ever get anything right.

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Recall Roundup: Takata, Toyota, Ford, and VW

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week.

The issue with defective, shrapnel-bomb-in-the-making Takata airbag inflators continues to grow. This week, Toyota has once again issued an expansion of its own Takata recall, adding a further 247,000 vehicles into the mix. The problem, if you haven't heard of it, is related to the Takata-sourced airbag inflator part; in certain higher-humidity locations, the inflator might accidently, well, explode.

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Volvo Cars Wants to End Fatal Crashes by 2020

New 360-view technology aids vehicles in avoiding collisions.

Could fatal crashes really be a thing of the past? In a perfect world filled with autonomous vehicles, yes, but even with the current widespread adoption of driver-assist technologies in newer vehicles, we still have a long way to go before vehicular deaths drop from 32,850 (NHTSA stats for 2013) to zero.

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Recall Roundup: Germany, Japan, and the U.S.

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week.

Audi has an airbag issue, but thankfully, it isn't related to the current Takata recall. Instead, Audi's own recall focuses on a software glitch in the 2012-2014 Audi A4. This glitch might prevent the front airbags from deploying, which could be a problem if you get into an accident. It affects about 102,000 cars in the United States (and 748,000 elsewhere in the world).

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Recall Roundup: Toyota, GM, Mercedes, and More

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week, shall we?

Toyota has issued a massive recall, affecting 1.67 million vehicles worldwide, although only 420,000 of them are in the United States. The recall relates to an issue with the fuel system; there might be a loose seal between the fuel delivery pipes and the fuel pressure sensor. This might cause a fuel leak, which in turn might cause a fire, since the leak is in the engine bay.

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Yet Another Record-Breaking Year for Fuel Efficiency

Maybe we're actually taking this fuel-economy thing seriously.

Every year, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) releases a Trends report, in which it dissects carbon-dioxide-emissions and fuel-economy numbers for the previous model year of vehicles. It then compares it to every other year of data, a library's worth of numbers that stretches all the way back to 1975. This year is yet another good year for the U.S. as we slowly approach the seemingly-insane fuel-economy requirements that will become reality in 2025.

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