Recall Roundup: Takata, Toyota, Ford, and VW

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week.

The issue with defective, shrapnel-bomb-in-the-making Takata airbag inflators continues to grow. This week, Toyota has once again issued an expansion of its own Takata recall, adding a further 247,000 vehicles into the mix. The problem, if you haven't heard of it, is related to the Takata-sourced airbag inflator part; in certain higher-humidity locations, the inflator might accidently, well, explode.

Read More

Volvo Cars Wants to End Fatal Crashes by 2020

New 360-view technology aids vehicles in avoiding collisions.

Could fatal crashes really be a thing of the past? In a perfect world filled with autonomous vehicles, yes, but even with the current widespread adoption of driver-assist technologies in newer vehicles, we still have a long way to go before vehicular deaths drop from 32,850 (NHTSA stats for 2013) to zero.

Read More

Recall Roundup: A Few from Chrysler, Many from GM

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week, shall we?

Our first recall from this week is for the 2013-2014 SRT (née Dodge) Viper. Chrysler has issued a recall for 1,912 Vipers due to an issue with a seat-position sensor. This sensor, which tells the airbag how to deploy based on seat proximity, might malfunction; when that happens, the airbag might not inflate correctly based on where the occupant is seated, and improper airbag inflation is never a good thing.

Read More

Recall Roundup: Toyota, GM, Mercedes, and More

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week, shall we?

Toyota has issued a massive recall, affecting 1.67 million vehicles worldwide, although only 420,000 of them are in the United States. The recall relates to an issue with the fuel system; there might be a loose seal between the fuel delivery pipes and the fuel pressure sensor. This might cause a fuel leak, which in turn might cause a fire, since the leak is in the engine bay.

Read More

Yet Another Record-Breaking Year for Fuel Efficiency

Maybe we're actually taking this fuel-economy thing seriously.

Every year, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) releases a Trends report, in which it dissects carbon-dioxide-emissions and fuel-economy numbers for the previous model year of vehicles. It then compares it to every other year of data, a library's worth of numbers that stretches all the way back to 1975. This year is yet another good year for the U.S. as we slowly approach the seemingly-insane fuel-economy requirements that will become reality in 2025.

Read More

Recall Roundup: Three Big Ones from Ford, Toyota, and FCA

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week, shall we?

This isn't related to the Takata-sourced airbag-inflator recall. Instead, this one affects what Ford calls the "restraints control module," which is a control unit that oversees airbag functionality. This module might short circuit, and when that happens, some of the airbags might be disabled. The module can also adversely affect the stability control and other safety systems. The module can be swapped out for one that works.

Read More
More Articles