Small Cars: Still Not Good at Crashing

The IIHS shows us how hard it is to teach old dogs new tricks.

If there are three guarantees in life, they're death, taxes, and vehicle crash tests. Every year, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) finds new and interesting ways to drive cars into solid structures, and then they study the data and tell us which cars are the safest. Every automaker does its best to design cars to excel in these crash tests, but when new tests come out in the middle of a vehicle's lifespan, the results are not good.

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BMW Creates Its Own Fast-Charging Station

The German stalwart is taking a page from Tesla's textbook.

One of the biggest issues with electric vehicles at the moment is charging time. With most standard plugs, it takes hours upon hours to return your EV to a full charge. And, with most EV ranges under 300 miles, this fact could be troublesome for drivers with long commutes or the desire for a proper road trip. Tesla's already remedied the situation for its own brand by installing high-powered Superchargers. No other automaker has a similar system - until now, thanks to BMW.

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Recall Roundup: Multiculturalism

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week, shall we?

Takata's recall of its airbag inflator is reaching epic proportions. Now, BMW has jumped back into the fray by announcing a recall of every single 3 Series built between 2000 and 2006 (that's the E46 generation, for you Bimmerphiles). That's between one and two million vehicles, all for a faulty airbag inflator. As soon as BMW gets the parts, it'll notify the affected owners, many of whom are undoubtedly very excited to go back to the dealership.

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Recall Roundup: It Never Stops, Does It?

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week, shall we?

The case of the faulty Takata airbag inflators claims even more victims this week, as Mazda announced yet another recall, this one affecting 18,050 vehicles. If you're new to this problem, Takata-supplied airbag inflators might emit more shrapnel than airbag in the event of an accident. Repairs start in August, so be on your best behavior until then.

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Recall Roundup Addendum: Who Else but GM

Once again, we have too many recalls to fit into a single roundup.

This first recall affects 22 whole vehicles. Those 22 vehicles are split between 2015 versions of the Chevrolet Tahoe, Chevrolet Suburban, GMC Yukon, and GMC Yukon Denali. Evidently, workers on the assembly line used an incorrect nut to hold the interior roof rails in place. In the event of an accident, that nut might tear into the roof-mounted airbags, rendering them useless. Even the smallest recalls are still important.

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Recall Roundup: Mostly Fire

Let's see what's new in automotive recalls this week, shall we?

Honda's escaped the last few months' worth of recalls largely unscathed. Now, though, we're including the Japanese OEM in the roundup thanks to an issue with the 2013 and 2014 Acura ILX luxury compact sedan. Both the ILX and ILX Hybrid are affected by the problem; apparently, when the cars are stationary, there isn't enough moving air to cool the halogen projectors. If they overheat, they can melt and start other parts of the car on fire.

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