Drivers will need to blow into a breathalyzer, whether they've been drinking or not, regardless of whether they have a past DUI on their record.

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tarting July 1, French drivers will need to do one more task before buckling up and driving off.

They'll need to blow into a breathalyzer, whether they've been drinking or not, regardless of whether they have a past DUI on their record.

French drivers are already required to carry a warning triangle and visibility vest with them. Now, they'll be required to spend about two euros (around $2.65 as this is written) on a single-use breathalyzer or face a fine of 11 euros (about $14.56).

breathalyzer Drivers in France will need to start carrying breathalyzers around starting in July.

The single-use breathalyzers will be for sale at ferry and rail stations, and multi-use units are available. Fines will be imposed beginning November 1, and enforcement will be carried out through spot checks. This law will also apply to rental cars, which means tourists would be carrying breathalyzers as well.

This is a new and fairly strict attempt at curbing drunk driving, but to safety advocates, it makes sense, especially in a country in which the legal limit is .05 BAC. Whether the use of the devices will cut down on drunk driving remains to be seen, however, as it doesn't appear that France is requiring the devices to be interlocked with the ignition. And, of course, a sober person could be used to circumvent the device.

We applaud attempts to reduce drunk driving, but the effectiveness of this law appears unclear.

[Sources: Whatcar, Motor Authority]