I

f we have learned nothing about Facebook, Twitter, and Foursquare "check-ins," let this be the coup de grace: after a 17-year-old girl posted a photo to Facebook of wads of money, the house she was staying at was robbed. She had been helping her 72-year-old grandmother count her savings.

The girl took a photo of a large amount of money, then posted it to Facebook. Later that night, two men armed with a knife and a wooden club stormed into the girl's parents' home (which was in an entirely different city from where the photo was taken) and demanded to know about the money.  

Police say that this is a reminder of the dangers of putting such personal information on any social media site.

The girl's mother told them that her daughter wasn't home and that she didn't even live there anymore, the men searched the house and looted, taking a small amount of money as well as other personal property.

No one was injured in the incident, but police say that this is a reminder of the dangers of putting such personal information on any form of social media.

We think that the most interesting part is that they showed up to her mother's house—either they knew the girl personally and knew her old address, or they looked up her name and found the most recent address. Either way, it's safe to say that posting your constant whereabouts on Foursquare or Facebook, or posting photos of a bunch of money, make you a pretty easy target for a break-in, since people know where you live, when you're away from home, and what sort of things you own.